Housing & Residential Development

Housing & Residential Development

HOUSING THEORY
The evolution of housing (or residential) development and architecture is often the result of physical, social, cultural and ideological influences. Physical structure is informed by climate, available construction materials, as well as available skills and labor. Social structure is guided by family patterns, lifestyle patterns, economic implications, and social needs. Ideological influences include cultural ideals and expectations, meaning of home, public vs. private space, and attitudes about urban vs. rural.

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GARDEN CITIES
In 1898, Ebenezer Howard, in his book “The Garden Cities of To-Morrow”, imagined a future where these influences intersect to inform an ideal environment for living.

“Human society and the beauty of nature are meant to be enjoyed together. The two magnets must be made one. As man and woman by their varied gifts and faculties supplement each other, so should town and country… The town is the symbol of society—of science, art, culture, religion… The country is the symbol of God’s love and care for man. We are fed by it, clothed by it, and by it are we warmed and sheltered. Its beauty is the inspiration of art, of music, of poetry… Town and country must be married, and out of this joyous union will spring a new hope, a new life, a new civilisation.” – Ebenezer Howard

 

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WISHING CRYSTAL
In the 1920’s and 1930’s, small, individualized homes were illustrated and promoted in plan books from the likes of The Radford Architectural Company and the Sears and Roebuck House Catalogs.

“A man who builds a house owes a duty not alone to himself but to the neighborhood as well. He really has no moral right to construct a home that will be a blight on the landscape. The other home owners in the neighborhood have some rights. The kind of house built without plans is the kind that lacks all the style and makeup that help beautify any neighborhood.” – William A. Howard

 

 

 

~ OL+ RESIDENTIAL DEVELOPMENTS ~
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Elm Street Development >>